Cinecast Episode 159 – Muscles and Anger and Spit and Moustache

Though short one contributor this week, we end up having one of the more stretched out shows in a long time; partly due to the most epic conversation on Matt Damon you’re ever likely to hear. Coupled with a pretty lengthy talk on recent viewings including another narrated dissertation on The Big Lebowski and a discussion on Chan Wook-Park’s Vengeance trilogy, now on DVD, makes for a rather circumlocutory dialogue that hopefully doesn’t bore.

As always, feel free to leave your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!


To download the show directly, paste the following URL into your favorite downloader:
http://rowthree.com/audio/cinecast_10/episode_159.mp3

 
 
 
Full show notes are under the seats…


show content



show content



show content


IN-HOUSE BUSINESS:


MAIN REVIEW:
Green Zone (Andrew’s review)


OTHER REVIEWS:
A Prophet (Marina’s review)


WHAT ELSE WE WATCHED:
High and Low
Doomsday
Clash of the Titans
An Education
The Big Lebowski


TOP 5 MATT DAMON FLICKS:

Andrew:
5. Dogma
4. Rounders
3. Ocean’s 11
…top 2 are mentioned in the show

Kurt:
5. The Bourne Supremacy
4. Oceans 12
3. Gerry
…top 2 are mentioned in the show


DVD PICKS:

Andrew:
Under Great White Northern Lights
(Andrew’s review)

         
Kurt:
Vengeance trilogy
(IMDb)

  • DVD of the Documentary
  • DVD of The White Stripes 10th Anniversary Show Under Nova Scotian Lights
  • Double LP/CD of 16 live tracks
  • “Icky Thump” (Live) and “The Wheels On The Bus” (Live) 7″ EP
  • 208-page hardcover photo book (foreword by Jim Jarmusch)
  • Rob Jones silk-screen print

 

BLU RAY:

Andrew:
Broken Embraces
(Andrew’s review)

         
Kurt:
Fallen Angels
(IMDb)


OTHER DVDs NOW AVAILABLE:
Twilight: New Moon
Princess and the Frog
Ninja Assassin
Pontypool [Blu-Ray] Dillinger is Dead [Criterion]


OTHER STUFF MENTIONED:

Peter Graves dead at 83

Matt Damon is the actor of the aughts.

Definition of FUCK:

 
Lebowski poster (click image for larger):


NEXT WEEK:
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
Fish Tank
Repo Men


PRIVATE COMMENTS or QUESTIONS?
Leave your thoughts in the comment section below, or email us:
feedback@rowthree.com (general)
andrew.james@rowthree.com
kurt@rowthree.com

 

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Antho42
Guest

Love the show, but can you guys do what Filmjunk and Slashfilm does in that they have two segments for a particular movie: one without spoilers and one with spoilers. Other than that, everything in the podcast is incredible.

Kurt
Guest

A valid suggestion, and I like how FJ and /Film aim to please as many folks as possible with that approach. But we simply have no interest in talking about films that we have both seen but not being able to talk about them, and the show is rather free-form and un-planned (yay, professionalism!) which is how we like it.

Glad you are enjoying things though, many folks just hold off on the episode until they have seen the film we spend the bulk talking about, or skip along via the show-notes time-tags.

Kurt
Guest

FYI, the Peter Graves Movie whose title I flubbed is actually THE CLONUS HORROR (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0078062/)

Antho42
Guest

Thanks for the Fallen Angels recommendation, here is my review:

One of the most, overuse words in the internet is “pretentious.” In the IMDB boards, with art films, it is rare to find a thread that does not critique the film on the ground of being “pretentious.” The overuse of the word has rendered it meaningless, in both film criticism and discussion, since for the most part, it is wrongly utilized. However, it does not follow that there are not films that are “pretentious.” On the contrary, there are tons of awful and misguided films that fit the label.

At first glance, Wong Kar Wai’s Fallen Angels might appear to fit the negative label — with its eccentric, unnatural, and unorthodox direction and storyline. Yet, the film does not—since there is a purpose to the bold, artistic elements. “Pretentious” only applies to films that include nontraditional elements, simply to be different, or to appear more intelligent than then it actually is; in other words, films that try to be “arty” for meaningless and for shallow purposes. Wong’s daring decisions are not pointless: they actually enrich the film; the film will be an inferior product, without the auteur’s aspects

There is not a movement in the work, that the audience does not separate the fact that it is simply a “film.” But what Wong accomplishes with the film medium — like the famous painters Picasso, Matisse, and Monet did with painting medium — is to make an abstract work that still manages to emotionally connect with the audience. Watching the characters interact is an enjoyable experience. They may be caricatures, but they make sense in Wong’s Hong Kong. Despite all of them being quirky, they all have their own personality, and thus, feel organic. It is a hung out film: it feel as if you are transported to Hong Kong, interacting with the characters.

In comparison to his rest of filmography, the film is not anywhere near the top — those spots belongs to In the Mood of Love and the Chungking Express. Its story does not match In Mood of Love; its energetic, free spirit does not match Chungking Express—mainly because it is a lesser sequel and it does not include the fabulous Faye Wong. A lesser Wong’s film is still a must see, and Fallen Angels is no exception. Do not be afraid of an Impressionistic, ultra cool Hong Kong.

wpDiscuz