Cinecast 82 – Ends Not with a Bang, But with Bewilderment


This Episode:
Southland Tales, The Counterfeiters, another Top 5 list and DVD picks.

Unwrap the complete Show Notes…

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LIMITED Show notes for Cinecast Episode #82

    No time tracks today – maybe later. Sorry for the inconvenience.

Bumper Music by “Run D.M.C.” and “The Darkness”


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Southland Tales:

Andrew’s review
Kurt’s review

 
 

See Also: Denys Arcand’s Stardom:

Stardom

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


The Counterfeiters:

Andrew’s review

 
 

See also Josef Losey’s Mr. Klein:

Mr Klein

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Top 5 Shitty Movies by Otherwise Great Directors:

Kurt:

And the ‘playing with the MGM logo’ – is this the first instance of this? From The Vampire Killers:

MGM Logo Vampire

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Andrew:


FYI, This is David Thewlis who headlines the fantastic Mike Leigh film Naked, but we should have mentioned he is in a couple of the Harry Potter films which would maybe rang more bells for folks:

David Thewlis

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


DVD picks for Tuesday, March 24-31

Kurt:
John from Cincinatti
John from Cincinatti

Andrew:
The Mist
The Mist
Andrew’s Review
Kurt’s Review


Comments or questions?
Leave your thoughts in the comment section below, or email us:
feedback@rowthree.com (general)
andrew@rowthree.com
kurt@rowthree.com
– – Kurt’s BLOG

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Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Another couple Great directors with a particularly bad film:

Peter Weir – Greencard

Robert Altman – Dr. T and the Women

Michael Winterbottom – 9 Songs

Matt Gamble
Guest

Tideland is Gilliam's best film in years. Between this and Southland Tales my faith in Kurt has taken a serious beating..

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

I suppose points should be given for Gilliam going all the way in making an uncompromisingly gruesome 'magical-real' modern fairy tale…I just found the execution of the thing as flat as the Saskatchewan Prarie, the plot points overly familiar, the characters hollow, the acting sub-par, and the pacing leaden. Cinematography was pretty good for the most part. Everything else was meh.

Perhaps I should have taken Andrews advice and switched over to THE BROTHERS GRIMM, if I ever get around to watching it, the talk has been that the thing is relentlessly mediocre.

Also Tideland was a serious case of high expectations not being met, whereas Southland Tales is a (somewhat of a) case of low expectations being challenged.

Matt Gamble
Guest

I think Tideland would make an outstanding double feature with Pan's Labyrinth. The fairytale narrative, the idea that children can handle horrific events far better then adults can (a theme found in many of Gilliam's films), and the shifting perspectives of reality and fantasy of the films.

The acting sub-par? Wha? Jodelle Farland is outstanding in the film, and I don't think her performance, which carries the entire film, is highlighted enough. It's incredibly rare, let alone difficult, for a child can carry such a dramatic film. Brendan Fletcher and Janey McTeer also give great performances, especially compared to something like Southland Tales, in which every actor is clearly out of their depth with their characters and gives the entire film a veneer of convention that it is trying so hard to pass off as profoundness.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

@ Southland Tales : "which every actor is clearly out of their depth with their characters and gives the entire film a veneer of convention that it is trying so hard to pass off as profoundness."

aha! And I believe that is the key thesis of Southland Tales, or it is a really, really happy accident for Richard Kelly!

@ Tideland : I think much of this stuff was covered better in Gilliam's Time Bandits (escape to fantasy, when your parents are zoned-out-drones (Games Shows and living room-bound in that film instead of rock 'n heroin in Tideland)…I can't articulate what rubbed me the wrong way about Ferland's performance…but I saw 'acting' for the movie more than 'character' – perhaps because everyone and everything is just hollow in the film.

Matt Gamble
Guest

I think you are spot-on about Tideland/Time Bandits, and I do believe Gilliam has made the same comparison himself.

As for the hollowness, I do believe that was the point, rather blatantly articulated by Jeff Bridge's character Noah, who is literally hollowed out and stuffed with sawdust. Yet Jeliza-Rose is able to have as much of a relationship with her father when he was stuffed as when he was alive. Toss in her obsession with the dolls and her best friend's obvious mental limitations and you have a film that revels in the simple beauty that is a child's imagination.

Though I must admit that I also adore Tideland because it was the introduction to Gilliam for my girlfriend. She was a huge fan of Jeunet, so it was great fun to introduce her to one of his primary influences.

As for Southland Tales, I'm firmly in the camp of happy accident. As ST does nothing to convince me that Kelly is doing anything other then pandering to the cult of Darko. He's a pornstar, he simply doesn't realize it.

Marina Antunes
Admin

Yeah…am surprised to see "Tideland" on the list. I really appreciate the messages in the film and though I did like it, it's not something I can recommend lightly. I didn't have any issues with the acting, Ferland really worked for me, but the pacing was off at times and the long running time IS a bit of a detractor but there's so much more at play than I can wrap my head around at this exact moment. Matt's recommendation of a double bill with Pan's is great though that'll make for some seriously depressing film viewing.

rot
Guest

Southland Tales is not smart enough to have a thesis. playing actors against type is fine, and I can actually see how this could have been some Gilliamesque satirical future dystopia but there is too much presupposing of importance to the delivery, presupposing of coherency even. Listening to Kelly on the creative screenwriting podcast he talks about how obvious he thought it was that the Timberlake lip-sync sequence has to do with the song being in the background when he was hit by a stray grenade by Stifler. now I knew this information prior to watching the show and I still do not see any such connection. the film feels like half-thought out ideas that only make sense in Kelly's head. also horrible comedic timing, and horrible pacing of ideas.

rot
Guest

hey you got that Cineaction cover from me, no?

Kurt
Guest

Indeed, that picture was the easiest to find on my local drive, courtesy of your kind self, Mr. Rot. 🙂

Been to the mega-digital new AMC yet?

rot
Guest

just came back from my first AMC experience… thats it, no more Paramount for me. Loved it, love also how close it is. will be great for TIFF, has a whole lot more class than the Paramount. The place was empty though on this its official opening… may have something to do with how big it is, that is feels empty. The bad aspect though, the films they are showing there are absolute shit… resorted to seeing Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day.

Henrik
Guest

David Thewlis fucking rules. I love that guys face and voice.

Ross Miller
Guest

My thoughts on directors who are consistently good but have stumbled on occasion:

Wong Kar WaiMy Blueberry Nights – This is a man so in control of making his films just flow perfectly (in particular In The Mood For Love), almost getting by on visuals alone. His films seem to speak without dialogue and just connect in a way that few others are able to accomplish. He, for some reason, decided to purchase a translator device and make a film in English. And the result just….didn't….work…..in the slightest.

Tim BurtonPlanet of the Apes – Now this is a movie where I see the hate for it from almost everyone and don't agree completely. I admit it's a bad film but I kinda have fun with it. But there's no denying that when you hold it up against stuff like Beetlejuice, Big Fish, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Edward Scissorhands and the '89 Batman and it sticks out like a sore thumb.

Stanley KubrickEyes Wide Shut – Although it's not a bad film (as it IS Kubrick and even his bad day is better than most people's good ones) it's none the less his weakest that I have seen. To me it was a kind of intriguing but ultimately pointless movie. Maybe I missed the point of it and upon another viewing I may click with it but for now, when compared to the masterpieces he was responsible for in his career, it just pales.

Will post more if I can think of them.

Shannon the Movie Mo
Guest

You're in Toronto Rot? I had no idea! Is the AMC going to be a TIFF venue? Smack dab between Ryerson and Elgin, interesting.

I walked by that huge AMC at Dundas/Yonge today… I couldn't even tell where the entrance was. Was headed to the Carlton though. I'm looking forward to a more downtown location that has a lot of screens to help with the longevity factor on some films, especially if they don't end up at the Bloor.

Sorry, I think that has nothing to do with the Cinecast… haven't had a chance to listen to it yet!

rot
Guest

Yeah there is a lot of us here from Toronto it seems.

the other thing I like about AMC (or at least my experience of the Dundas/Yonge one): no commercials!!! Three trailers, then bam into the movie.

Shannon the Movie Mo
Guest

No commercials? Huzzah! I have to check it out!

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

The AMCs out in the 'burbs always have less commerials than the not-nearly-as-nice Cineplex/Famousplayers gaudy SilverCity/Collosus nightmares. However, the AMC still shows 3 commercials, 2 in-housse promos (Moviewather, GiftCertificates) and on average 5-6 trailers. While I don't have a huge problem with that, I'd be superhappy if it were three well-programmed trailers and nothing else, that'd be heaven actually. I wonder how long it will last.

Also, are you sure that the AMC will be handling the reins of TIFF until the festival centre is up and going? I could certainly live with that. Anything to minimize Paramount screenings!!

The only thing I do give the Paramount (now Scotia Theater) is that they've always been friendly to Sony Classics releases of Anime features. Metropolis,Paprika, CowboyBebop, etc have all screened magnificently vibrant prints there.

rot
Guest

I thought I read somewhere that the AMC was going to be used for TIFF… it would make sense because it is a much classier place than the kid-centric Scotiabank Center.

Now you got me worried Kurt, it could be that they are new and do not have advertisers just yet to bombast before the film… I really really hope not. They also didn't have the annoying looping E Canada coverage that other theatres use. I got the impression that they heeded the advice of so many complaints and adjusted accordingly… they even have a 2:1 ratio of women's washrooms because there are always longer line-ups for women. The theater I watched Pettigrew in was not terribly big but a good size, I wonder what the range of size is throughout the complex.

Shannon the Movie Mo
Guest

I guess I'm in the minority as I like the TIFF screenings at Scotiabank, mostly because of stadium seating (at 4'9" it makes a big difference!) and they are rarely sold out. I wonder what the capacity is at the AMC's.. I did a search but couldn't find anything.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Well the 'burbs AMC theatres range from 80-700 seats.

They have never instituted the 'video' E!Now style advertising before the films, however, I was at an AMC in Chicago and they did have it there, and it was quite annoying. I always assumed the multiplexes in our neighborhood just didnt want to upgrade (they do do the silent trivia oriented slide-show stuff which I don't mind as I can read my book or talk to whomever is with me…)…

Of course Famous/Cineplex have loads of commercials, promos and those annoying video-style crap so I can't read my book. I've boycotted that chain (exception: Cumberland, because they show art films and not so much ads) due to the crappy practices,…

Marina Antunes
Admin

We don't have an AMC out West but it sure sounds like a nice theater. We've still only got one US company in our midsts out here – Tinseltown (which is owned by the Cinemark chain) and it's one of my favourite local theaters. Not only do they often show a load of their CineArt films (which are essentially "art hosue" films) but hey often have a great mix of both recent/new/big blockbuster films and small, indie fare. To boot, they have one of the lowest ticket prices in town (for the first run films) and they have the best seating in town (reclining seats!). I wish there were more of them and they they still had the early morning screenings.

Good show guys!

Marina Antunes
Admin

Darn…now I'm excited to check out "Stardom". Picked it up for $5 on director cred alone and it sounds like it's going to be an interesting watch!

rot
Guest

Is it just me or is this becoming the worst year of film? With the end of March we are now a quarter of the way through the year, and without doubt I have never gone so long, so disinterested in what was playing in the theaters. What 2008 films have stood out?

Funny Games and Cloverfield for me. thats it.

Kurt Halfyard
Admin

Indeed. And Funny Games is a shot-by-shot remake of a 1997 film.

I liked Doomsday, Horton Hears A Who, and Cloverfield and In Bruges was certainly watchable, but I've been disinterested in Theatre-Going too. Or like Andrew, playing catch-up with last year. There is a lot of good stuff on the horizon, and Jan-March is pretty sad every year. We had Black Snake Moan & Zodiac and The Host in March though. Grindhouse, 28 Weeks Later, Hot Fuzz, The Lookout and such didn't start appearing in theatres until April-May 2007.

Colleeny
Guest

Yep, The start of the year always is kinda slow. It the catch up with the Oscar contenders/winners season. Doomsday and Funny games are the highlights so far, but In Bruges, Bank Job, and Normal were all decent flicks.

Shannon the Movie Mo
Guest

It's true the beginning of the year can be a bit dry. I've liked a few so far:

Continental, un film sans fusil

George A. Romero's Diary of the Dead

Persepolis

Starting Out in the Evening

Up the Yangtze

rot
Guest

April doesn't look much better… flipped through the Tribute mag list of openings and I think there was only one I was mildly interested in seeing: The Incredible Hulk… if only because the big showdown between Hulk and Abomination happens right in front of Toronto's very own gentlemen's club, the Zanzibar.

Marina Antunes
Admin

No joke, the highlight for me so far was "The Grand" and "The Year My Parents Went on Vacation" was pretty good too.

John Allison
Editor

No real highlights for me yet (discounting There Will Be Blood since its a movie from last year).

Stop-Loss (review coming as soon as I'm done with year end shite) was a let down but I was pretty sure it was going to be.

The Bank Job was decent and way more violent than I thought it was going to be but still just decent.

Horton was good but I didn't enjoy it as much as Kurt did.

Veggie Tales was Veggie Tales and is good if you are 4 or 5.

Doomsday was a let down for me.

I'm feeling a big movie funk right now and can't wait for something to blow me away like Black Snake Moan did last year.

John Allison
Editor

@Andrew – Just like I told Kurt before…. Shut it…. 🙂

Although now that I think back on it any movie that has cheesy puffs that try to eat a main character is a winner in my book.

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