Cinecast Episode 500 – You’re On Your Own From Here…

Ten damn years! The Cinecast has been around for ten years totaling (more than) 500 episodes. We’ve argued over, bickered about, tongue-bathed, laughed about and quoted movies for close to 2000 recorded hours. We’ve made loads of new friends, lost loved ones, earned degrees, visited other continents, entered the covenant of marriage, written books, attended countless festivals, interviewed celebrities and even starred in a couple of low budget films in that time. And the amount of alcohol consumed… I don’t even want to think about it. We have some of the most devoted listeners in podcasting and I have to believe we’re in the running for most hours recorded of one series in the history of podcasting at this point. Therefore, of course we have a good hour of reminiscing and say thanks to a few important folks. But as we hit this momentous milestone we, for the most part, treat it like any other episode except for one big in-house announcement. We have three theatrical reviews: Thor: Ragnorak, The Killing of a Sacred Deer and Murder on the Orient Express. Then we take some time to look back at the year that is 2017 which of course includes a top five list. We also fulfill on a years-old promise (or at least half of it) with a retro-review of Tyrannosaur in return for a generous donation from listener Len Fearnside.

This is The Cinecast 500. Yes, have some.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

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Friday One Sheet: The Post

It is no secret, I love negative space in poster design. Here is the key art for Steven Spielberg’s Nixon Era ‘document leak’ movie, The Post, starring Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks and a slew of others. The poster offers out of the ‘boxes of all the actors’ hack style poster, and goes for the ‘large steps of an institution’ image, with a tiny Hanks & Streep (facing away from the viewer) dwarfed by those steps. In light of the crisp Helvetica typeface, I do like the included handwritten signature of a release date, particularly because it seems that the story of the film is to obtain that signature to publish the secret government documents.

I have tucked the trailer below the fold to give you an idea of the kind of Oscar-bait America-Feel-Good exercise that the film might be. Cynicism aside, it feels clearly motivated by something like previous Oscar-winner Spotlight (And in the rich history of movies about newspapers, Zodiac and All The President’s Men) and that is pretty fine. It also feels a bit like a spiritual sequel to Bridge of Spies, one of Spielberg’s more underrated recent films.

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Trailer: Swinging Safari

It has been a few years since The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert – 23 in fact – and while director Stephen Elliot has been working on and off in the ensuing decades, it appears here he has returned to the over-the-top form that made for such a wonderful cult film. Swinging Safari is a very broad and colourful comedy set in an very over-styled swinging-1970s Aussie milieu, the film stars Guy Pearce and Kylie Minogue, among others goofing it up at key parties and other poolside shenanigans. Will it work for 90 minutes? Who knows, but it looks like a lot of silly fun.

1970s Australia: A 200-ton blue whale washes up on a local beach and the kids think it’s the biggest thing that’s ever happened in their lives. Behind closed doors, the Mums and Dads of this quiet suburban cul-de-sac celebrate in their own special way, by joining the sexual revolution. It’s a time of boxed wine, bad hair, bad styles, bad choices, but good times. And like the rotting whale, it’s all about to go spectacularly wrong.

Friday One Sheet: In The Fade

A gorgeous one-sheet featuring a gorgeous actress: Diane Kruger. Here she is working with German-Turkish director Fatih Akin examining the after-effects of a terrorist bombing on one woman who loses her son and husband in the attack. It’s difficult, exactly, to tell this from this glittery urban-lit poster, that is as reminiscent of Blade Runner as it is of Old Boy. Maybe the rain makes things seems sad? But the first rule of old-school marketing is sell the star, and this picture does so magnificently. It even drops the laurel in the top left corner indicating Ms. Kruger picked up the best acting nod at this years Cannes festival. And just to show you how much Photoshop is used these days (you know this already, of course) here is Ms. Kruger not in the rain.

After the Credits Episode 220: November Preview

Summer love

We missed October due to festival and scheduling craziness but I’d like to think we more than made up for it with a couple of bonus episodes from VIFF.

The crew is, however, reunited this month as Colleen, Dale (Letterboxd) and I (Letterboxd) look ahead at November which is a mishmash of everything from action adventure (Thor: Ragnarok) and family fare (Coco) to awards hopefuls (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri).

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Friday One Sheet: Colour Chart [Lady Bird]

Making subtle use of the classic photo colour chart as a border/trim, the new poster for the directorial debut of Greta Gerwig (which was a huge hit at this years TIFF) goes for photographic intensity of its lead actress, Saoirse Ronan, sans freckles. For those who noticed the christian cross and ‘monastery font’ of the original poster, you can see these themes you can see they remain here, although the emphasis is strictly on ‘portrait photography.’ Typically this is the domain of the South Koreans when designing posters, but I like it when it gets adopted on this side of the pond.

Trailer: P.T. Anderson’s Phantom Thread

“Whatever you do, do it … carefully.” There, ladies and gents is the mission statement of P.T. Anderson in a nutshell. His latest film, Phantom Thread, which has quietly been winding its way through post production reunites the director with his star Daniel Day-Lewis, here strangely channeling late-period Ralph Fiennes (just close your eyes, and you can see Fiennes in the role just through the audio association). Of course, it is clear from the trailer that Day-Lewis shall deliver as mesmerizing a performance as his Daniel Plainview in There Will Be Blood. Here he plays a mysterious tailor that likes to sew mysteries into his garments. The film follows his relationship with a waitress (Vicky Krieps) he courts, and eventually makes a model for his clothes.

Set in the glamour of 1950’s post-war London, renowned dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock and his sister Cyril are at the center of British fashion, dressing royalty, movie stars, heiresses, socialites, debutantes and dames with the distinct style of The House of Woodcock. Women come and go through Woodcock’s life, providing the confirmed bachelor with inspiration and companionship, until he comes across a young, strong-willed woman, Alma , who soon becomes a fixture in his life as his muse and lover. Once controlled and planned, he finds his carefully tailored life disrupted by love.

Visually impressive, yet somehow cold and austere as well, in a fashion that brings Anderson closer to Kubrick and further from Altman. I expect the dual meaning title Phantom Thread will be a stand out in a year that has been a spectacular year of ambitiously visual projects, including Dunkirk, Blade Runner 2049, mother!, Okja, War For The Planet Of The Apes, Lady MacBeth, Hagazussa, Valley of Shadows, The Killing of A Sacred Deer, A Cure For Wellness, and The Florida Project.

Friday One Sheet: Minimalist Medusa [Acrimony]

A minimalist, two colour poster for Tyler Perry’s latest non-Madea film, Acrimony showcases the Greek creature Medusa in stark black against a red field. There is shadow that resembles a curtain, but otherwise the poster favours simplicity. There is no credit block, just the name of the film, the lead actress (Hidden Figures‘ Taraji P. Henson), and the R-Rating logo down in the lower left corner. Note there is another pink (of course, it’s 2017) minimalist, poster with a similar hand-drawn and stenciled look, that plays with what is probably the first act of the film, if the Medusa is the ‘revenge; portion of the film described as, “a faithful wife tired of standing by her devious husband is enraged when it becomes clear she has been betrayed.”

Teaser: I, Tonya

After making big waves at this years edition of the Toronto International Film Festival, both in terms of audience appreciation, as well as upstart distribution Neon paying $5 Million dollars for the rights, the Margot Robbie starring biopic I, Tonya gets a snappy, stylish and snarling little teaser to when the palette. Craig Gillespie (Lars and the Real Girl, Fright Night) directs and Allison Janney (shown only briefly here) also stars in the flip side of the story of Tonya Harding, the exceptionally talented figure skater that defied the image of the sport by being a whole-lot ‘trailer trash’ in terms of her presentation. If you were around in the 1990s, she became a household name in North America and the woman everyone loved to hate during the 1994 Olympics after details (and a guilty plea) came to light about her violent assault on fellow American skater Nancy Kerrigan.

Blu-Ray Review: Carnival of Souls – Criterion Collection

Director: Herk Harvey
Screenplay: John Clifford
Starring: Candace Hilligoss, Frances Feist, Sidney Berger, Art Ellison, Stan Levitt
Country: USA
Running Time: 78 min
Year: 1962
BBFC Certificate: 12


Once in a while, a film that was initially deemed a failure finds a new lease of life several years later, becoming what is often referred to as a cult classic. One such film was the 1962 horror Carnival of Souls, which was originally released as a double bill with The Devil’s Messenger, to little fanfare. Over time the film found its fanbase though, leading to a re-release in 1989 which helped cement its cult-status. What’s particularly sad about this very long road to recognition though was that the director Herk Harvey and writer John Clifford never made any other feature films, as they were retired by the time people’s love for Carnival of Souls finally appeared (and they have since passed away). The pair worked for Centron Corporation, an industrial film company that made corporate and public information films. They made Carnival of Souls in their holidays, then went back to their day jobs at Centron, which is a real shame as it’s a fantastic film and I’d have loved to have seen what else they could do.

Carnival of Souls opens with a car full of young women, including Mary Henry (Candace Hilligoss), getting into a road race with a car full of young men. What starts as a bit of fun ends in tragedy when the girls’ car careens off the side of a bridge into the river below. The car can’t be found, but hours later Mary appears from the river, dazed but physically healthy. She’s so traumatized by the event, she feels she has to leave town to escape the memory of what happened. So she heads off to Utah to be a church organist. On the way, she drives past a strange abandoned pavilion on the Great Salt Lake and finds herself strangely drawn to it. It triggers visions of a strange, pale-faced man though who keeps appearing and drawing ever closer. As no one else seems to see him, she begins to question her sanity. Being a strong-willed woman, she feels the need to face the problem head on.

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Cinecast Episode 499 – Automat

Blade Runner 2049 fixes some things about the original 1982 film. This is exactly why Andrew is happy and why Kurt is pissed off. Also, is it basically a remake in disguise? The boys dissect. Up next, what if The Coen Brothers and Quentin Tarantino were married and their child was a gore hound? You’d have S. Craig Zahler and Brawl in Cell Block 99 would be his sophomore effort.

Kurt is back from Sitges and we get a little taste of that experience at the beginning of the show. Towards the end of the episode, Andrew has been turning off his brain with mostly junk cinema while Kurt saw his favorite film of the year. Have a listen and make your case/point in the comments below.

As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

We’re now available on Google Play!

 

 
 

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