Trailer: Wind River

Taylor Sheridan wrote Sicario for Dennis Villeneuve and Hell or High Water for David Mackenzie. Now, he’s directing one of his own screenplays, a wintry noir called Wind River. An FBI agent (Elizabeth Olsen) teams with the town’s veteran game tracker (Jeremy Renner) to investigate a murder that occurred on a Native American reservation. Canadian veteran actor Graham Green is the local police presence, and Canuck rocker Hugh Dillon (The Headstones, Hard Core Logo) also has a small part. I’m a sucker for procedural crime movies set in the winter (from Fargo, to Insomnia, to Smilla’s Sense of Snow) and this looks superb in that ‘no nonsense’ Sheridan fashion.

Wind River will be getting a semi-wide release from The Weinstein Company on August 4th.

Friday One Sheet: Mondo’s Get Out

This years major break-out voice in Horror (comedy) was Jordan Peele’s Get Out. Upon its original release, it was unfortunately saddled with perhaps the worst poster of the year (so far). Fortunately there is Mondo who have taken a couple key design elements and images and have made a pair of superb black and white (after all, isn’t that what the movie is about?) posters. The above poster takes the tea-cup from the film and grafts on Daniel Kaluuya to almost give it the surreal feel of a vintage Polish style poster, if you are familiar with what is going on in the movie, having a spoon ‘stir’ his brain is equally effective as an image. Dropping the credit block in the middle is also an interesting touch, who says these ‘required elements’ need be at the bottom.

A second Mondo poster featuring the ‘dark place’ from the film is solid, but nowhere near as eye-catching as the above one.

Thanks to Birth.Movies.Death for the hook-up here.

Star Wars @ 40

On this day, 40 years ago, George Lucas’s $11M investment on a ‘Kurosawa Chanbara film meets Dambusters’ sci-fi adventure with laser swords, moon-sized battle stations, aerial dogfights in space, kooky pseudo-religions, charming droids, smugglers, Wookies, and hairbun-and-gun-toting princesses, changed the way films were made, marketed, merchandised, and well you know the rest. On an admissions basis, Star Wars is the second all time highest film (behind Gone With The Wind), but its cultural legacy (still going strong) seems to transcend age, culture, and era, and continues to churn out Billion dollar franchise entries, while kindling the imaginations of children (and endless think-pieces, nostalgic reveries and commentary from movie-nerd adults.)

Roger Moore: 1927 – 2017

It has not been a good week for fans of the James Bond Franchise. Earlier, the first singer to pass, of all those who had contributed a credits song was Soundgarden’s Chris Cornell at 52. Now the Big C has claimed the life of Roger Moore, the third actor to play James Bond, and the first one to shuck off this mortal coil at the age of 89. While Moore was often associated with the ‘silly phase’ of the franchise (culminating with the space romp, Moon Raker), in fact things has taken an over-the-top tone as early as the fourth film, Thunderball (1965) a few years earlier when Sean Connery still had the role. Moore had a lighter, more above-it-all, attitude that he carried throughout the 1970s and well into the 1980s. His model of 007 was clearly the template for the Pierce Brosnan era that followed in the 1990s.

Moore started his career on television, where he was involved with several series in the 1950s and 1960s, the chief among them modern day Robin Hood vigilante series, The Saint, which ran for most of the latter decade. This was often cited as the reason he got the James Bond role after Australian George Lazenby turned down long term commitments to the role after making only a single film. Moore went on to make seven 007 films over twelve years, starred in a few other (forgettable) action films in both the UK and the US concurrent to his lengthy stint as the worlds most famous super spy. He went into retirement after 1985’s A View To A Kill, popping out for charity work (Unicef, PETA) or the occasional sly casting in parodies of spy films.

The Guardian has more.

DVD Review: The Salesman

Director: Asghar Farhadi
Screenplay by: Asghar Farhadi
Starring: Taraneh Alidoosti, Shahab Hosseini, Babak Karimi
Country: Iran, France
Running Time: 119 min
Year: 2016
BBFC Certificate: 12


Asghar Farhadi’s The Salesman got a lot of attention earlier this year when the film’s cast and crew boycotted the Academy Awards in protest over US President Donald Trump’s order which blocked entry of citizens from Iran and six other Muslim-majority countries to the U.S. This boycott also prompted a free screening of the film in Trafalgar Square in London in a sign of solidarity. Following this, The Salesman went on to win the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. The cynic in me felt the film maybe won the award due to the stand made, but, having loved Farhadi’s A Separation from 2011, I thought I’d better see for myself whether or not it deserved the accolade.

The Salesman sees married couple Rana (Taraneh Alidoosti) and Emad (Shahab Hosseini), who are currently acting together in a production of ‘Death of a Salesman’, forced to move to a friend’s apartment temporarily after their apartment block is badly damaged and deemed dangerous. In this new accommodation, Rana is assaulted after she mistakenly buzzes someone in, thinking they’re her husband. She is deeply affected by the attack, but doesn’t want to bring the police into it, afraid of the shame that will come upon her when asked to speak of the incident and testify about what happened. Emad is out for revenge though and investigates himself. He discovers the apartment’s previous tenant was a prostitute and the attacker was likely one of her clients expecting his usual treatment. He also finds they left their pickup truck outside so locks it in the block’s garage, in the hope of catching the owner when they return to pick it up. As Emad gets closer to finding the culprit, he drifts further away from his wife, who doesn’t want the man found. She just wants Emad to be there for her and help her come to terms with what happened.

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Cinecast Episode 483 – Drag Me to Hell

We’ve come full circle. The Cinecast started with an argument on Alien and almost ten years later it continues with an argument about Alien: Covenant (SPOILERS!). Almost ninety minutes of chatting about the inner-workings of Ridley Scott’s brain and his plan for the current state of, and future of the Alien franchise. Something things to love, some things that aren’t quite as lovely. But rest assured with double the Fassbender, there is a lot to discuss here. After that, we try to rank out the order of Fincher’s filmography should be exposed to children after some talk on Zodiac. Our beloved Romancing the Stone makes another Cinecast appearance as well as Mendelsohn and Reynolds grinding through Mississippi. And hey Tarantino’s breakout hit is actually a master class in editing. We talk about the kids’ experience with “R” rated material and remember our own childhoods and being turned away from the multiplex for not having the proper ID.

Turns out the Alien franchise is a nice morning warm-up and we’re happy to share it with you. But beware of face-huggers and SPOILERS! As always, please join the conversation by leaving your own thoughts in the comment section below and again, thanks for listening!

We’re now available on Google Play!

 

 
 

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Blu-Ray Review: Mulholland Drive

Director: David Lynch
Screenplay: David Lynch
Starring: Naomi Watts, Laura Harring, Justin Theroux, Robert Forster
Country: USA
Running Time: 146 min
Year: 2001
BBFC Certificate: 15


Last year, BBC Culture ran a survey of 177 film critics from around the world to determine what they felt were greatest films of the 21st Century. The well-publicised results found David Lynch’s Mulholland Drive claiming the top spot. It rejuvenated interest in the film, particularly as Lynch’s continuation of his Twin Peaks series was announced around the time. Studiocanal jumped on this by giving the film a new restoration and re-releasing it on Blu-Ray with a few added special features. I haven’t seen the film since the early 2000s, shortly after its original home release, so I’ve been keen to give it a rewatch, particularly with all the Lynch love going around with the new series of Twin Peaks starting last night. This gave me the opportunity I was after then, so here are my thoughts on the film.

Giving a synopsis of Mulholland Drive is a tricky business, as it might depend on your interpretation of the plot and the latter third in particular gets pretty surreal. However, to avoid spoilers or debatable interpretations of the film, I’ll focus on the basic setup in the first half. Here we see an actress, later referred to as Rita (Laura Harring), escape being shot when she’s involved in a car accident on the titular Hollywood road. She’s left with amnesia and wanders into an apartment currently occupied by wannabe actress Betty (Naomi Watts), who just arrived in town. Betty wants to help Rita, so the two set about investigating, to find out who she is and what happened to her. Meanwhile, film director Adam (Justin Theroux) is struggling to get his latest project off the ground as some shady mafia types seem to have a stranglehold over production, forcing him to hire an actress as the lead against his will. His life is further troubled by the discovery of his wife in bed with another man. His path converges with the two actresses later on, as their journey takes increasingly dark and puzzling turns.

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After the Credits Episode 209: Littlest Hobo Media Spew – April

Let the obsession begin!

Let there be movies!

In a slight change of pace for the crew, in addition to huge amounts of television, this past month we’ve also been watching a heck of a lot of movies.

Join us as Colleen, Dale (Letterboxd) and I (Letterboxd) touch base on what we’ve been watching, reading and listening to and this month including some minor gushing about a couple of shows with Canadian ties.

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